Special Education Children

Tiffany Johnson, a special-education teacher, got a large raise after earning the rating "highly effective" for two years in a row.

WASHINGTON — During her first six years of teaching in this city’s struggling schools, Tiffany Johnson got a series of small raises that brought her annual salary to $63,000, from about $50,000. This year, her seventh, Ms. Johnson earns $87,000.

Read the rest of this entry

Share

IDEA transition provisions – an overview

IDEA is the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act – America’s special education law.

IDEA has specific provisions about how IEP teams plan for a student’s transition to life after IEPs.

This is your child’s future we’re talking about.

Read the rest of this entry

Share

Last month, the Council for Court Excellence published sobering statistics in its report, “Unlocking Employment Opportunity for Previously Incarcerated Persons in the District of Columbia.”

The council found that the unemployment rate for ex-offenders in Washington, D.C., is as high as 46 percent. According to the report, 8,000 individuals were released from prison or jail into the District last year, and it is anticipated that about 4,000 of these individuals will re-offend, finding themselves back behind bars in the next three years.

Read the rest of this entry

Share

Policy Brief Discusses Slight Enrollment Decline, 17 Percent Increase in Pell Grant Need

WASHINGTON, Dec. 20, 2011 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Record-breaking enrollment increases have been the norm at community colleges for the last four years, but now, it appears that enrollment is leveling off. According to a new policy brief released today by the American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), there has been an enrollment decrease of almost one percent since fall 2010.

Read the rest of this entry

Share

The New Year: Improving Public Schools

As 2011 makes way for 2012, I am reminded that Mayor Vincent Gray was sworn into office a year ago, after having placed fairness, high standards and community engagement at the heart of his education plan. One year on, how close has he come to realizing the plan that helped his campaign succeed?

Read the rest of this entry

Share

Some officials associated with the District’s public charter schools are lauding an initiative that will streamline the way these schools are evaluated.

The Public Charter School Board, parents and other stakeholders spent almost three years developing the Performance Management Framework (PMF), which will be an evaluation tool to assess and monitor charter school performance. Schools that are rated will fall into one of three tiers. Tier 1 schools will have met standards of high performance; Tier 2 schools are those which fall short of high performance standards but meet minimum overall performance; and Tier 3 schools are those which fall significantly short of high performance standards and show inadequate performance. Tier 3 schools that fall below 20 percent of an established number of points may have their charters revoked.

Read the rest of this entry

Share

The District of Columbia continues to struggle with unemployment rates above the national average despite more jobs than residents. That has D.C. leaders trying to figure out how to better prepare Washingtonians to compete in the job market. Commentator Martha Ross, a fellow at the Brookings Institution’s Metropolitan Policy Program, says the city must work to give students alternative.

Unemployment and economic opportunity in the District are both in the news a lot these days.

Read the rest of this entry

Share

What’s Working in Urban Schools

At first glance, it would appear there is little to cheer about with America’s urban schools. Results from the “Nation’s Report card,” released Nov. 1 by the U.S. Education Department, were disappointing: no true narrowing of the black/white achievement gaps. High school graduation rates are shockingly low, especially among the most academically fragile students. Only 47 percent of black males, for example, graduate from high school.

Read the rest of this entry

Share

D.C. to train more special-ed students to use Metro

D.C. school officials are increasing their efforts to teach special-education students to take Metro to school, as the city tries to cut the $26,000-per-student annual cost of transporting them by bus.

D.C. Public Schools and other city education leaders are identifying students whom they believe can be “trained” to navigate public transportation, and who attend schools that are accessible by bus or train from their homes.

Read the rest of this entry

Share

Is there such a thing as an unacceptably low college graduation rate?

There is seemingly universal agreement in higher education that college completion rates aren’t high enough. Yet it’s difficult to find anyone pointing fingers at a particular college. Lawmakers lament the low graduation rates of students who receive federal Pell grants, the largest source of federal student aid to low-income students. Yet to criticize a college with a large Pell student population and a miniscule graduation rate is thought to be bad form.

Read the rest of this entry

Share
 Page 2 of 4 « 1  2  3  4 »
s2Member®