District cutting back on training in many disciplines

Only a handful of the drivers trained through D.C.'s commercial driver's license job training program last year actually got hired by WMATA.

As D.C. tries to tackle unemployment, the D.C. Department of Employment Services is making major changes to the city’s job training program. There have been serious questions about the outside groups tapped to help unemployed residents find work, and as it turns out, the city has also struggled to make sure it is training people for the right jobs.

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D.C. forum discusses rising poverty, unemployment

Washington, D.C. — The U.S. Census Bureau released last week a devastating statistic: nearly half of all Americans are living in poverty or near poverty.

While the finding barely made its way into the media, and has yet to be seriously discussed by any of the 2012 presidential candidates, Tavis Smiley and Cornel West have made it their mission to bring poverty back onto the national agenda.

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Today, DCFPI is releasing a “resource map” of workforce development services in the District of Columbia. This project, a culmination of nearly two years of effort, offers a visual way to see how our city spends its resources on services to help residents get and retain jobs. We hope it’s a policy brief that would make the character Rod Tidwell—“Show Me The Money”—in the 1996 film Jerry Maguire proud.

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Jobs where people work the most for the least

Truck drivers still work nearly 200 hours annually more than the average American.

The average person in the U.S. works just over 2,000 hours per year, or 39.5 per week, and is paid $37,128 per year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Some occupations, however, require long days and night shifts, amounting to hundreds of extra hours, yet they pay the same or even less than most occupations. 24/7 Wall St. has identified the jobs with the longest hours and the worst pay.Of the nearly 800 job categories listed by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, only 48 occupations require at least 2,100 hours annually — roughly 100 more than the national average. Most of these positions also are paid very well, averaging more than $80,000 per year.

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Division of Labor: The Gap Between Skills and Jobs

While much of the country struggles with job creation, D.C. is in the unique position of having more jobs than residents. So why are some D.C. neighborhoods facing Depression-era unemployment rates? DCentric examines how D.C.’s healthy economy has left out so many Washingtonians and what some are doing to close the unemployment gap.

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